Women's Human Rights Resources

International Legal Agreements:

CEDAW Advocacy:

Legal Cases Mentioning CEDAW:

 

CEDAW status in WLP partner countries

 Convention SignatureConvention Ratification or Accession(a)Convention Reservations and DeclarationsOptional Protocol SignatureOptional Protocol Ratification
Afghanistan14-Aug-19805-Mar-2003   
Bahrain 18-Jun-2002(a)Art 2 and Art 16 for compatibility with Islamic Shariah; Art 9(2); Art 15(4); Art 29(1)1  
Brazil31-Mar-19811-Feb-1984Art 29(1)13-Mar-0128-Jun-02
Egypt16-Jul-198018-Sep-1981   
India30-Jul-19809-Jul-1993Art 29(1); Art 5(a) and Art 16(1): shall abide in conformity with its policy of non-interference in the personal affairs of any Community without its initiative and consent; Art 16(2): fully supports the principle of compulsory registration of marriages in principle but not practical in a vast country like India with its variety of customs, religions and level of literacy.1  
Indonesia29-Jul-198013-Sep-1984Art 29(1)28-Feb-00 
Iran     
Jordan3-Dec-19801-Jul-1992Art 9(2); Art 16(1c,1d,1g)1  
Kazakhstan 26-Aug-1998(a) 6-Sep-0024-Aug-01
Kyrgyzstan 10-Feb-1997(a)  22-Jul-2002 a
Lebanon 16-Apr-1997(a)Art 9(2); Art 16(1c,1d,1f,1g); Art 29(1)1  
Malaysia 5-Jul-1995(a)Art 9(2); Art 16(1a,1f,1g). Accession is subject to provisions not conflicting with those of Islamic Sharia' law and the Federal Constitution of Malaysia.1  
Mauritania 10-May-2001(a)Approve each and every part which are not contrary to Islamic Sharia or Mauritania's Constitution.  
Morocco 21-Jun-1993(a)Art 2; Art 15(4); Art 9(2); Art 16; Art 29(1)  
Nicaragua17-Jul-198027-Oct-1981   
Nigeria23-Apr-198413-Jun-1985 8-Sep-0022-Nov-04
Pakistan 12-Mar-1996(a)Art 29(1). Subject to the provisions of the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan.1  
Palestine     
Turkey 20-Dec-1985(a)Art 29(1)8-Sep-0029-Oct-02
Zimbabwe 13-May-1991(a)   
 Source: United Nations Treaty Collection http://treaties.un.org for a list of all countries
1. Some countries object to these reservations or declarations as contrary to the object and purpose of the convention.
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S:SSO to Sakai