What We Do

WLP’s work uses the programmatic strategies of (1) leadership and advocacy curriculum development, (2) training at the grassroots, national, and regional levels (3) strengthening civil society, and (4) women’s human rights advocacy and movement building.

WLP’s programmatic strategies are overlapping and mutually supportive, with the following objectives for each:

Curriculum Development: To create culture‐specific training and advocacy manuals that furnish grassroots activists in the Global South with materials to strengthen democracy activism, the women’s movement, and youth with materials in leadership, ICTs, political participation, organizational capacity building and evaluation, and advocacy for women’s human rights.

Training: To implement flexible and accessible participatory leadership training for an increasing number of civil society organizations and grassroots women so they can acquire the skills necessary to actively shape their future, assume leadership in their communities, and become activists committed to strengthening democracy and women’s rights.

Strengthening Civil Society: (1) To increase partner organizations’ capacity in strategic program implementation and evaluation, sustainable organizational development, ICTs, and mobilization and management of human and financial resources, to strengthen their ability to implement empowerment programs and foster women's agency in developing moderate, secular civil societies. (2) To build partners’ capacity to take collective action by providing them with opportunities to cooperate and deepen relationships among themselves and with other civil society organizations at the national and regional levels.

Women’s Human Rights Advocacy and Movement Building: (1) To mobilize women and youth at the grassroots to effect social change and legal reform for gender equitable societies. (2) To build and strengthen grassroots, national, and international networks that promote democratic governance and peace‐building and increase the capacity of marginalized, moderate civil society activists to effectively engage in prominent networks with opinion leaders, policy makers, and academics. (3) To increase accurate and timely coverage of women's rights and democracy issues by leveraging conventional and alternative media to raise awareness and engage a broad spectrum of individuals in constructive dialogue.

Alerts & Updates
August 18, 2015 | 2015 Events, Africa, Americas, Asia, Human Rights, Middle East, ICT for Social Change, Young & Emerging Leaders
Women’s Learning Partnership (WLP) and The Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) present The World We Seek: Reigniting the Dialogue on Human Security. September 14, 2015, 9:30am-5:00pm.
July 2, 2015 | Advocacy, Africa, Human Rights, penal code, Stop Violence Against Women, Victories over Violence, Morocco
In response to the recent arrest of two Moroccan women for violating “public modesty” laws by wearing short skirts, WLP ‎Morocco‬/Association Démocratique des Femmes du Maroc (ADFM) along with other women's rights organizations convened a protest on Sunday, June 28, 2015, in Rabat. Read more here (Arabic). ADFM also issued the below statement to demand that the Moroccan government take necessary measures to protect women’s personal choice of clothing.
June 25, 2015 | Human Rights, Middle East, Saudi Arabia, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Young & Emerging Leaders
WLP is proud to announce that Dr. Thoraya Obaid, Chair of WLP's Board of Directors and distinguished advocate for women's rights in Saudi Arabia and across the Global South, earned the 2015 United Nations Population Award in the individual laureate category. The award recognizes Dr. Obaid's outstanding commitment, vision, and leadership in promoting population issues and the rights of women, girls, and young people.
June 22, 2015 | Asia, Human Rights, Kyrgyzstan
In Kyrgyzstan, two bills that present formidable threats to civil society and constitutionally-protected liberties are currently under review by Parliament. Echoing Russia’s policies toward NGOs, the “foreign agents” bill aims to intensify government oversight of such organizations under the pretext of national security. This bill not only extends to public authorities the right to intervene in the internal affairs of any NGO that receives foreign funding, but also forces such organizations to register as “foreign agents” or otherwise cease to operate within Kyrgyzstan.
S:SSO to Sakai