ICT for Social Change

ICT Capacity Building

Audio and video tools on using ICTs for women's activism.

Second Youth Tech Festival in Jordan: Report from the Field

November 11, 2010

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Asma Khader surrounded by participants at Youth Tech Festival II

In 2009, WLP’s First Annual Youth Tech Festival brought 110 young men and women from all over Jordan to Amman to acquire hands-on skills in using emerging technologies to advocate for social change. The nine-woman technology training team coached the young adults in creating their own engines of social change.

Worldwide, young people are using YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, website creation and blogging to connect and talk about the world they want to see and will have to live in.

What We Do

WLP’s work uses the programmatic strategies of (1) leadership and advocacy curriculum development, (2) training at the grassroots, national, and regional levels (3) strengthening civil society, and (4) women’s human rights advocacy and movement building.

WLP’s programmatic strategies are overlapping and mutually supportive, with the following objectives for each:

Curriculum Development: To create culture‐specific training and advocacy manuals that furnish grassroots activists in the Global South with materials to strengthen democracy activism, the women’s movement, and youth with materials in leadership, ICTs, political participation, organizational capacity building and evaluation, and advocacy for women’s human rights.

Training: To implement flexible and accessible participatory leadership training for an increasing number of civil society organizations and grassroots women so they can acquire the skills necessary to actively shape their future, assume leadership in their communities, and become activists committed to strengthening democracy and women’s rights.

Strengthening Civil Society: (1) To increase partner organizations’ capacity in strategic program implementation and evaluation, sustainable organizational development, ICTs, and mobilization and management of human and financial resources, to strengthen their ability to implement empowerment programs and foster women's agency in developing moderate, secular civil societies. (2) To build partners’ capacity to take collective action by providing them with opportunities to cooperate and deepen relationships among themselves and with other civil society organizations at the national and regional levels.

Women’s Human Rights Advocacy and Movement Building: (1) To mobilize women and youth at the grassroots to effect social change and legal reform for gender equitable societies. (2) To build and strengthen grassroots, national, and international networks that promote democratic governance and peace‐building and increase the capacity of marginalized, moderate civil society activists to effectively engage in prominent networks with opinion leaders, policy makers, and academics. (3) To increase accurate and timely coverage of women's rights and democracy issues by leveraging conventional and alternative media to raise awareness and engage a broad spectrum of individuals in constructive dialogue.

ICT for Social Change

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can sustain or deepen the power imbalance between men and women, rich and poor, the North and South. Those unfamiliar with ICT – its use, making, or deployment – do not reap its rewards and are unable to compete successfully.

The Women’s Learning Partnership recognizes the strategic potential of appropriate technologies to diminish the marginalization and isolation of women whose mobility is restricted by providing access to online ‘public’ spaces.

We aim to harness ICT for the empowerment of women, and for collective mobilization and advocacy purposes. Not only do we endeavor to give women access to ICT, but we also strive to help develop relevant content, to increase women’s ICT skills and confidence, and to extend their participation as producers of content and as ICT technicians.

Mobilizing for the Future with Mass Media and Participatory Web

February 1, 2010

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Information, communication, and media technologies are providing unimaginable power to connect people around the world by reducing barriers of distance, time, and cost. How can NGOs harness the power of mass media and the web to mobilize supporters of women's rights and build effective movements of the future?

Photo Blog of National ICT Training of Trainers Institute in Lebanon

August 14, 2009

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Women's Learning Partnership (WLP) and Collective for Research and Training on Development-Action convened a National Institute for Training of Women Trainers in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for Social Change in Beirut, Lebanon from Dec 9-12, 2007. The Institute was facilitated by WLP colleague Usha Venkatachallam. Learn more about the Institute through the photo blog below.

Youth + YouTube + Facebook = Social Change at Youth Tech Festival

August 14, 2009

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The room was buzzing. One youth group producing an original YouTube video on domestic violence. Another creating a poster urging youngsters to volunteer. All members of a third team busy on Facebook, inviting friends to join their newly-created group to fight child abuse. More sights such as these were part of the Youth Tech Festival in Jordan where over 90 young women and men (with a 9 all-female technology training team) gathered to acquire hands-on skills to utilize emerging technologies to advocate for social change.

Photo Blog of National ICT Training of Trainers Institute in Jordan

August 14, 2009

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Women's Learning Partnership (WLP) and Sisterhood Is Global Institute-Jordan (SIGI-J) convened a National Institute for Training of Women Trainers in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for Social Change in Amman, Jordan from Dec 3-6, 2007. The Institute was facilitated by WLP colleague Usha Venkatachallam. Learn more about the Institute through the photo blog below.

ICT Trainings Continue in Afghanistan Despite Challenges

May 9, 2008

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AIL held a training for both men and women in which the age gap between the youngest and the eldest was forty years. Such mixed and intergenerational trainings are rare in the western provinces. The participants included about twenty students and government officials from the Ministries of Education, Women’s Affairs, Public Health, and the Economy at the WLP/AIL Center for ICT training in Herat.

Making IT Our Own: Information & Communication Technology Training of Trainers Manual

April 28, 2008

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Making IT Our Own takes an assemble-your-own approach to ICT trainings by providing the necessary components—guidelines for participatory facilitation, step-by-step 'how tos' for each technology tool, learning resources on CD, and an assortment of pre-assembled agendas—so that trainers can customize and deliver effective technology trainings of their own suited to their communities. The manual uses scenarios to contextualize learning in everyday life and explore issues related to gender and technology.

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