Asia

WLP Partner Spotlight: Marfua Tokhtakhodzhaeva's New Book

November 11, 2007

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The Re-Islamization of Society and the Position of Women in Post-Soviet Uzbekistan

Marfua Tokhtakhodzhaeva BookMarfua Tokhtakhodzhaeva is the co-Founder of the Women's Resource Centre (WRC) of Tashkent, Uzbekistan, a WLP partner organization, before authorities closed it down in 2005 as a result of a government crackdown on civil society organizations. Ms. Tokhtakhodzhaeva remains actively involved in coordinating women's empowerment and leadership trainings with various organizations in the region. She has written a new book entitled The Re-Islamization of Society and the Position of Women in Post-Soviet Uzbekistan, examining the socio-political and religious shifts the country has undergone in the last twenty years. Ms. Tokhtakhodzhaeva focuses on the position of women in the Soviet era prior to the country's independence in 1991 compared to post-independence when the country began to re-introduce the customs and norms of Islam. Ms. Tokhtakhodzhaeva emphasizes that life in Uzbekistan has always seen a balance of good and bad in each era. Ms. Tokhtakhodzhaeva met with Program Associate, Christina Halstead, at the Women's Learning Partnership to talk about her book.

Uzbekistan

December 12, 2006

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Closed by the government

Tashkent Women's Resource Center (TWRC) has closed operations under pressure from the Uzbek government. The request to close down was issued by the Ministry of Justice immediately following the 2005 WLP-TWRC August 2005 Central Asia Institute for Women's Leadership and Training of Trainers. TWRC's fate is shared by many national and international non-governmental organizations in Uzbekistan as the government implements a wave of forced closures. International organizations subject to forced closure in 2006 include the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Freedom House, and the Eurasia Foundation. WLP will continue to work with partners in the Central Asia region to advance women's human rights and development.

Uzbekistan

December 12, 2006

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Closed by the government

Tashkent Women's Resource Center (TWRC) has closed operations under pressure from the Uzbek government. The request to close down was issued by the Ministry of Justice immediately following the 2005 WLP-TWRC August 2005 Central Asia Institute for Women's Leadership and Training of Trainers. TWRC's fate is shared by many national and international non-governmental organizations in Uzbekistan as the government implements a wave of forced closures. International organizations subject to forced closure in 2006 include the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Freedom House, and the Eurasia Foundation. WLP will continue to work with partners in the Central Asia region to advance women's human rights and development.

Khadija Haq on Women’s Political and Economic Empowerment in South Asia

March 4, 2006

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Women comprise a mere 7% of parliamentary seats in the South Asian region, which is half the world average of 14%. South Asian governments are beginning to take steps to increase women’s political participation through the establishment of quota systems at national and local levels. The one-third quota, however, needs to be instituted in all legislative, judiciary, and executive bodies at all levels, starting at the national level. This has yet to happen. Without a critical mass of women in national decision-making positions, South Asian women’s concerns will remain marginalized. Instituting quota systems is nevertheless only one step towards female political empowerment. We are still facing deep-rooted patriarchal traditions and attitudes that limit opportunities for women’s participation in public life. Rising communalism, religious fundamentalism, and conservatism are major limiting factors for women’s security and freedom.

Regional Learning Institute for Women's Leadership in Central Asia

August 31, 2005

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Regional Learning Institute for Women's Leadership in Central Asia participantsWomen's Learning Partnership (WLP) together with its regional partner convened a Central Asia Regional Learning Institute for Women's Leadership from August 24-27, 2005 in Shymkent, Kazakhstan. NGO leaders, journalists, and human rights activists from five countries - Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan - participated in the Institute, which consisted of a week-long intensive skills development program in participatory leadership, interactive facilitation, persuasive communication, and effective advocacy campaign development.

The Institute took place amidst an atmosphere of heightened security and political tensions in the region. In the face of increasing restrictions on civil society and NGOs, human rights, and press freedom in the region, WLP brought participants together to create a regional network of women's rights advocates working to advance women in leadership and decision-making positions.

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