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  • Second WLP Central Asia Regional Institute Brings Activists to Leadership and Advocacy Training

    November 11, 2010

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    For civil society, Central Asia has become one of the most difficult places to work. Freedom of assembly, an open press, and internet usage have eroded throughout the region.

    Uzbekistan has remained all but closed to NGO activity. WLP's former partner in Uzbekistan, Tashkent Women's Resource Center (TWRC), which organized WLP's first Central Asia Regional Institute in 2005 in cooperation with Shymkent Women's Resource Center (SWRC), was forcibly closed by the government in 2006.

    Kyrgyzstan has seen significant political turmoil, with a coup in April. A violent outbreak in southern Kyrgyzstan in early June led to further attempts to intimidate and silence human rights activists.

    Floods Still Devastating Pakistan in New Ways

    November 11, 2010

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    This summer, Pakistan faced the worst floods in its history, affecting over 20 million people. Before the flood waters receded, WLP launched a global appeal in support of our Pakistani partner, the Aurat Foundation, and its Motherland Flood Relief Campaign.

    The next several months will be critical to stemming the number of flood-related deaths and confronting the grave issue of food security. The floodwaters wiped out huge swaths of agricultural land that provided basic staples of rice and wheat to the population. Seeds, livestock and equipment were destroyed. In the huge provinces of Sindh and Punjab, roughly 90% of cropland has been lost.

    Religion, Culture and the Challenges of Change

    November 11, 2010

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    Challenges of Change: Religion, Secularism & Rights
    Panel 1: Chaired by Frances Kissling, Speakers Thoraya Obaid and Yakin Ertürk

    When a society is structured only according to shared values, the result is social continuity and a culture of domination by one group over another, said Yakin Ertürk, former United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women. When values are in competition – as between parents and children, citizens and the state, men and women, and the state versus the international community – they create openings for change and a culture of protest. "The human rights framework provides tools for the women's movement that we have not fully utilized," she said.

    Legislating Public and Private Spaces

    November 11, 2010

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    Challenges of Change: Religion, Secularism & Rights
    Panel 3: Chaired by Regan Ralph, Speakers Jacqueline Pitanguy, Asma Khader, and Eleanor Smeal

    Fighting for women’s human rights is fighting to save the planet and humanity itself, said Eleanor Smeal, founder and president of the Feminist Majority Foundation and former president of the National Organization for Women. Moneyed interests are the real opposition to women’s rights, “because if you give full rights to half the population you have to pay them better.”

    Claiming Our Rights Through Nonviolent Movement-Building

    November 11, 2010

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    Challenges of Change: Religion, Secularism & Rights
    Panel 4: Chaired by Carolyn Long, Speakers Pregs Govender (video), Marian Wright Edelman, and Mahnaz Afkhami

    Religion, Culture and the Challenges of Change

    November 11, 2010

    Related Articles

    Challenges of Change: Religion, Secularism & Rights
    Panel 1: Chaired by Frances Kissling, Speakers Thoraya Obaid and Yakin Ertürk

    When a society is structured only according to shared values, the result is social continuity and a culture of domination by one group over another, said Yakin Ertürk, former United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women. When values are in competition – as between parents and children, citizens and the state, men and women, and the state versus the international community – they create openings for change and a culture of protest. "The human rights framework provides tools for the women's movement that we have not fully utilized," she said.

    Second Youth Tech Festival in Jordan: Report from the Field

    November 11, 2010

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    Asma Khader surrounded by participants at Youth Tech Festival II

    In 2009, WLP’s First Annual Youth Tech Festival brought 110 young men and women from all over Jordan to Amman to acquire hands-on skills in using emerging technologies to advocate for social change. The nine-woman technology training team coached the young adults in creating their own engines of social change.

    Worldwide, young people are using YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, website creation and blogging to connect and talk about the world they want to see and will have to live in.

    BAOBAB Holds Political Participation Training in Abia State, Nigeria

    November 11, 2010

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    Political Participation Training
    Abia, Nigeria

    According to Nigeria's 2006 census, women are nearly half the country's population (48.78 percent) — a percentage that is not at all reflected in women's representation in government and decision-making positions.

    But that could change, and soon. As part of its commitment to increasing women's role in all of public life, BAOBAB held a July 21-27 training session in Abia for a group of politically enthusiastic and ambitious young women.

    Participants included members of the media, Abia state government officials, 30 young women undergraduates and 30 women political aspirants.

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    Media Inquiries
    Phone +(301) 654-2774 (or)
    email wlp@learningpartnership.org

    WLP President Mahnaz Afkhami is frequently interviewed as an expert on women’s rights issues in the Middle East and North Africa, and particularly on women in leadership, women and technology, Islam and women’s human rights, and culture and development.

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