Family Law Reform

Springtime of Dignity: Coalition For a Penal Code That Protects Women From Discrimination and Violence

June 25, 2010

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Declaration of the Creation of the Coalition:
"Springtime of Dignity"
For a penal code that protects women from discrimination and violence

The coalition, "Springtime of Dignity," is bringing together associations that defend and promote women's and human rights and that have decided to work in synergy in a lobbying movement, "For a penal code that protects women from discrimination and violence."

The coalition, "Springtime of Dignity," draws its strength from its values and accomplishments:

After Struggle, New Equality for Moroccan Women

January 31, 2007

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The Moudawana, the Personal Status Law established a year after Morocco's independence in 1957, declared that women were legally inferior to men. The new legislation, which is based on a reinterpretation of Islamic law, greatly restricts polygamy, gives women equal status with men, the right to initiate divorce, and shared family rights. Moreover, women no longer need a "tutor" -- generally their father or brother -- in order to get married.

Morocco Amends Nationality Code

January 25, 2007

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On January 18, 2007, the Moroccan Government passed a bill to reform the country's nationality code which will enable women the right to pass on their nationality to their children. The law was amended in line with the country's family code, the Moudawana, meaning that only Moroccan women who have married Muslim men in accordance with the Moudawana would benefit.

Morocco Adopts Landmark Family Law Supporting Women’s Equality

June 19, 2006

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On January 25, 2004, the government of Morocco adopted a new landmark Family Law supporting women’s equality and granting them new rights in marriage and divorce, among others.

Launch of Translation Series: New Advocacy Tool for the Reform of Family Law in Muslim-Majority Societies

March 2, 2006

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Family law in Muslim-majority societies governs every aspect of a woman’s life – from minimum age and conditions of marriage, to divorce, child custody, and the right to work, travel, or decide on a place of residence. The reform of family law is therefore crucial to women’s ability to participate on equal terms in both family life and public life. In each thematic module, the Guide presents the current state of the law, then proposes religious, human rights, sociological, and domestic legal arguments for reform, well-supported by relevant data.

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